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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of Long and Short Quoins and Pilaster Strips in Saxon Churches. found in the catalog.

Long and Short Quoins and Pilaster Strips in Saxon Churches.

Eric.G.M Fletcher

Long and Short Quoins and Pilaster Strips in Saxon Churches.

by Eric.G.M Fletcher

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Published by British Archeological Assoc in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Offprint from theJournal of British Archeological Association:Vol 9:1944.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17467337M

3 lancets to S, and 2 to W end with trefoiled lancet between. Saxon NE corner survives with long and short quoins, and E of it a pilaster strip, with similar strip reset on S wall. S porch gabled with pointed arch and buttresses, and vestry in NW corner under outshot roof, with steps to crypt to E side. W tower. a pilaster strip without a base or capital lights the major sub-divisions of the glazed area of a window lintel the beam that bridges the top of an opening long and short work quoins, usually of the Saxon period, with the stones placed with the long side alternately upright then horizontal lucarne a small window in a spire or roof mandorla.

Firstly a broad (introductory) look at Anglo Saxon churches in England. Most people will be familiar with the humble parish church, but we can read the stones which have such a story to tell. Look for the distictive Saxon long & short work of the quoins (corner . irregular long and short work and pilaster strips of green sandstone and ironstone, but the appearance it now presents is very different to its original aspect, for the whole church both within and without was covered in pro-conquest times with plaster, the only portions left uncovered being the quoins and pilaster strips.

  STRETHALL. Here stands one of the oldest buildings in Essex, a perfect little piece of Saxon architecture. It is the nave of the church, less than nine yards long, but with the typical long and short masonry of the Saxon builders, and with two of their windows to be seen inside, one a little round opening about eight inches across. The doorway has kept its Saxon jambs and arch, but more Author: Churchaholic. Such an interpretation presupposes that there was an earlier Saxon nave against which the present tower was built and that this older nave was replaced by one which has the surviving long-and-short quoins. Fig. Nassington Church. A number of alterations were made to .


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Long and Short Quoins and Pilaster Strips in Saxon Churches by Eric.G.M Fletcher Download PDF EPUB FB2

The walls are thin, as in many Saxon buildings and the church consisted of a nave and chancel. A look at the external corners of the walls also gives away it’s Saxon origin. In order to reinforce the structure, long and short stone quoins are used. The stone is. the strip-work alternate with the shorter stones in a fashion like that of long-and-short quoining.

It should be noted that, whereas this strip-work flourished in the south, it is not found north of the Humber. The photo left shows the fine strip-work at the ‘corners’ of the seven-sided apsidal chancel. Anglo-Saxon architecture, Volume 1 Hammerton heads Heapham hoodmouldings Hovingham important indication Inworth Jarrow Langford lateral porticus Ledsham Lincoln lintels long-and-short quoins LS quoins main fabric major arches megalithic Milborne Monkwearmouth moulded Mwearmouth nave Norman original pilaster-strips pilasters plain square.

Get print book. No eBook available. 12th century alterations angle quoins Anglo-Saxon appears arcade architectural base bears belfry beneath blocked building built buttress capitals carried carved century date chamfered chancel arch chapel church Conisbrough continued courses cross cross shaft cross Saxon Churches in South Yorkshire.

pilaster strips illustrat the same level osf com­ prehension regarding their constructio and n use of stones. The Anglo-Saxon craftsmen's deliberate and precise employmen of stont e in structures such as quoins, pilaster strips and jamb hass, of course, long been recognised.

a Terms s such 'long and short' (Rickman ; Micklethwaite. Breamore church. Detail of ‘pilaster strip’ at the meeting of nave and tower (south wall), and seen to the right the SW quoin of the transept or porticus, illustrating long & short work.

page 5. Note: the correct pronunciation of Breamore is “Bremmer”. I used to live in the adjoining village and. The lower stage is built with a different type of rubble stone and the narrow windows have square central pilasters in the lower stage and rounded pilasters in the upper stage.

The pilaster strips feature excellent Saxon 'long and short work'; alternating vertical and horizontal stones. Externally the long and short quoins on the corner of the west wall are Saxon and there is a blocked up doorway on the north wall which is also possibly Anglo Saxon.

During archaeological excavations, it was found that the Anglo Saxon west end, extended for a further six feet and fragments of Saxon stone carvings were also discovered. The church of St Andrew dates to the mid 11th century and exhibits every element of traditional Saxon architecture; the ground plan is original, with long-and-short work construction binding the walls, narrow pilaster strips for decoration, with a narrow a Saxon window and chancel arch.

Some have “pilaster strips”: raised courses of vertical and/or horizontal stonework and it is believed that the masons were simply re-creating a type of decoration that was more usually carved in wood.

This is known today as “Long and Short Work In churches this is unique to the Anglo-Saxon period although, of course, it is quite.

Long-and-short quoins. Pilaster-strips. Belfry towers with double windows and through-stone slabs. Irregularly laid out plans. LOCAL VARIATION OF STYLE Another difficulty which faces the student of Anglo-Saxon architecture is the quite wide variation of styles from.

Saxon building techniques had not yet been fully phased out, in favour of the incoming Norman methods). The Tower does not appear to incorporate any other major Saxon architectural feature of the pre-Conquest () period, such as “long and short” quoins (cornerstones), pilaster strips or double splayed windows These features, such as long and short work, pilaster strips, baluster shafts, triangular arches, and such like, are almost entirely absent in the county, and hence the number of churches recognized as of Saxon date has remained until now almost as small as when these observations were made.

But a careful examination by a patient observer will. ‘Long and short’ quoins The second photograph in the gallery shows the south and west walls of the church which display two typical Saxon architectural features, pilaster strips and long and short stone quoins. Pilaster strips are narrow low-relief vertical pillars, and can be seen at the centre of the west wall and to the left of the porch.

Larhord Engliscra Gesiþa Leaf 1 of 1 Date Of present church only tower is Anglo-Saxon, – or perhaps reign of Cnut –35 BB Long-and-short work at quoins Rom. No long-and-short work at quoins Brereton If long-and-short work is there, it is hidden by pilaster-strips.

Anglo-Saxon architecture was a period in the history of architecture in England, and parts of Wales, from the mid-5th century until the Norman Conquest of Anglo-Saxon secular buildings in Britain were generally simple, constructed mainly using timber with thatch for roofing.

No universally accepted example survives above ground. There are, however, many remains of Anglo-Saxon church. The blocked round-headed doorway on the north side, as seen in the photo above, is perhaps romanesque as are the ‘long and short’ stone corner quoins and the pilaster strips (seen on the exterior) dividing the nave wall into four sections.

At Sompting there is particularly good Saxon “long and short work” (alternate use of short horizontal and long vertical stones. Unusually, it is found on the pilaster strips rather than at the corners of walls. See, for example, Wittering Church in Cambs.

Corhampton Church, Hampshire Thin flint walls strengthened by the typically Saxon long-and-short stone quoins and the vertical stone lesenes surmounted by horizontal string course of stone.

Lancet window on south side from 13th century. Pilaster strips on the outside, plain block capitals. It is evident that Anglo-Saxon churches with long and short work and pilaster strips are distributed throughout England where this type of limestone was available, and in East Anglia where the stone was transported.

Every Century from the 10th onwards is represented in the fabric and fittings of the building!. It is evident that Anglo-Saxon churches with long and short work and pilaster strips are distributed throughout England where this type of limestone was available, and in East Anglia where the stone was transported.

St Andrew and St Stephen on the rood screen painted by Henry Bird InHenry Bird painted the 15th century rood manship: Central.The earliest example of Anglo Saxon churches in Oxfordshire date from and are St Michael at the NorthGate, Langford and North Leigh.

They all boast Anglo Saxon features such as: long-and-short quoins (masonry blocks at the corner of a wall) double triangular windows; narrow, round-arched windows (often using Roman tile); herringbone.St Peter's Church is the former parish church of Barton-upon-Humber in North Lincolnshire, is one of the best known Anglo-Saxon buildings, in part due to its role in Thomas Rickman's identification of the style.

It has been subject to major excavations. The former Church of England church is now run by English Heritage and houses an exhibition exploring its nation: Church of England.